Wrist

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition that causes pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and arm. The condition occurs when one of the major nerves to the hand — the median nerve — is squeezed or compressed as it travels through the wrist. 

In most patients, carpal tunnel syndrome gets worse over time, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. Early on, symptoms can often be relieved with simple measures like wearing a wrist splint or avoiding certain activities.

If pressure on the median nerve continues, however, it can lead to nerve damage and worsening symptoms. To prevent permanent damage, surgery to take pressure off the median nerve may be recommended for some patients.

Anatomy

The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway in the wrist, about an inch wide. The floor and sides of the tunnel are formed by small wrist bones called carpal bones. The roof of the tunnel is a strong band of connective tissue called the transverse carpal ligament. Because these boundaries are very rigid, the carpal tunnel has little capacity to "stretch" or increase in size.

The median nerve is one of the main nerves in the hand. It originates as a group of nerve roots in the neck. These roots come together to form a single nerve in the arm. The median nerve goes down the arm and forearm, passes through the carpal tunnel at the wrist, and goes into the hand. The nerve provides feeling in the thumb and index, middle, and ring fingers. The nerve also controls the muscles around the base of the thumb.

The nine tendons that bend the fingers and thumb also travel through the carpal tunnel. These tendons are called flexor tendons.

Description

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the tunnel becomes narrowed or when tissues surrounding the flexor tendons swell, putting pressure on the median nerve. These tissues are called the synovium. Normally, the synovium lubricates the tendons, making it easier to move your fingers.

When the synovium swells, it takes up space in the carpal tunnel and, over time, crowds the nerve. This abnormal pressure on the nerve can result in pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand. 

*All Information provided by The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

De Quervain's Tendinosis

De Quervain's tendinosis occurs when the tendons around the base of the thumb are irritated or constricted. The word "tendinosis" refers to a swelling of the tendons. Swelling of the tendons, and the tendon sheath, can cause pain and tenderness along the thumb side of the wrist. This is particularly noticeable when forming a fist, grasping or gripping something, or when turning the wrist.

Anatomy

Two of the main tendons to the thumb pass through a tunnel (or series of pulleys) located on the thumb side of the wrist. Tendons are rope-like structures that attach muscle to bone. Tendons are covered by a slippery thin soft-tissue layer, called synovium. This layer allows the tendons to slide easily through a fibrous tunnel called a sheath.

Any swelling of the tendons and/or thickening of the sheath, results in increased friction and pain with certain thumb and wrist movements.

De Quervain tenosynovitis of the first extensor compartment.

Reproduced from: Griffin LY (ed): Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care, 3rd Edition. Rosemont, IL. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2005.

Causes

De Quervain's tendinosis may be caused by overuse. It also is associated with pregnancy and rheumatoid disease. It is most common in middle-aged women.

Symptoms

Signs of De Quervain's tendinosis:

  • Pain may be felt over the thumb side of the wrist. This is the main symptom. The pain may appear either gradually or suddenly. Pain is felt in the wrist and can travel up the forearm. The pain is usually worse when the hand and thumb are in use. This is especially true when forcefully grasping objects or twisting the wrist.

  • Swelling may be seen over the thumb side of the wrist. This swelling may accompany a fluid-filled cyst in this region.

  • A "catching" or "snapping" sensation may be felt when moving the thumb.

  • Pain and swelling may make it difficult to move the thumb and wrist.

*All Information provided by The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

The radius is the larger of the two bones of the forearm. The end toward the wrist is called the distal end. A fracture of the distal radius occurs when the area of the radius near the wrist breaks.

Distal radius fractures are very common. In fact, the radius is the most commonly broken bone in the arm.

 Description

A distal radius fracture almost always occurs about 1 inch from the end of the bone. The break can occur in many different ways, however.

One of the most common distal radius fractures is a Colles fracture, in which the broken fragment of the radius tilts upward. This fracture was first described in 1814 by an Irish surgeon and anatomist, Abraham Colles -- hence the name "Colles" fracture.

 Causes

The most common cause of a distal radius fracture is a fall onto an outstretched arm.

Osteoporosis (a disorder in which bones become very fragile and more likely to break) can make a relatively minor fall result in a broken wrist. Many distal radius fractures in people older than 60 years of age are caused by a fall from a standing position.

A broken wrist can happen even in healthy bones, if the force of the trauma is severe enough. For example, a car accident or a fall off a bike may generate enough force to break a wrist.

Good bone health remains an important prevention option. Wrist guards may help to prevent some fractures, but they will not prevent them all.

Treatment

Treatment of broken bones follows one basic rule: the broken pieces must be put back into position and prevented from moving out of place until they are healed.

There are many treatment options for a distal radius fracture. The choice depends on many factors, such as the nature of the fracture, your age and activity level, and the surgeon's personal preferences.

Nonsurgical Treatment

If the broken bone is in a good position, a plaster cast may be applied until the bone heals.

If the position (alignment) of your bone is out of place and likely to limit the future use of your arm, it may be necessary to re-align the broken bone fragments. "Reduction" is the technical term for this process in which the doctor moves the broken pieces into place. When a bone is straightened without having to open the skin (incision), it is called a closed reduction.

After the bone is properly aligned, a splint or cast may be placed on your arm. A splint is usually used for the first few days to allow for a small amount of normal swelling. A cast is usually added a few days to a week or so later, after the swelling goes down. The cast is changed 2 or 3 weeks later as the swelling goes down more, causing the cast to loosen.

Depending on the nature of the fracture, your doctor may closely monitor the healing by taking regular x-rays. . If the fracture was reduced or thought to be unstable, x-rays may be taken at weekly intervals for 3 weeks and then at 6 weeks. X-rays may be taken less often if the fracture was not reduced and thought to be stable.

The cast is removed about 6 weeks after the fracture happened. At that point, physical therapy is often started to help improve the motion and function of the injured wrist.

Surgical Treatment

Sometimes, the position of the bone is so much out of place that it cannot be corrected or kept corrected in a cast. This has the potential of interfering with the future functioning of your arm. In this case, surgery may be required.

Procedure. Surgery typically involves making an incision to directly access the broken bones to improve alignment (open reduction).

Depending on the fracture, there are a number of options for holding the bone in the correct position while it heals:

  • Cast

  • Metal pins (usually stainless steel or titanium)

  • Plate and screws

  • External fixator (a a stabilizing frame outside the body that holds the bones in the proper position so they can heal)

  • Any combination of these techniques

*All Information provided by The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Distal Radius Fractures (Broken Wrist)

17 Elm Avenue, Hackensack, NJ USA 07601

Opening Hours:

Mon:  8am - 5pm

Tues, Thurs. : 9am - 5pm

Wed : 9am - 6pm

Fri : 8am - 3pm

​​Saturday: Closed

Sunday: Closed

CONTACT

Phone: (201) 968-0508

Fax: (201) 968-0509

© 2019 by Meese Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center Michael A. Meese M.D

                                             HealthGrades | RateMDs

  • Facebook Social Icon

Visit Us on Facebook